Marshmallow or Meanie Pants?

Marshmallow or Meanie Pants?

As a sales leader, there is one overarching thought to keep
in mind: It is your responsibility to push your sales reps to greater heights
than they would achieve on their own. Otherwise, you are excess cost.

When it comes to doing this, too many times we find sales
leaders who are extreme. They either want to be their salespeople’s friend
(marshmallow) or feel like they have to be drill sergeants (meanie pants).

I recently conducted a webinar for a group of both new and experienced sales leaders on this topic. Its focus was on sales leadership accountability and as is true with most […]

Data Reveals Missing Accountability Traits in Sales Leaders

Data Reveals Missing Accountability Traits in Sales Leaders

Statistics abound about the abysmal state of quota attainment by salespeople. We’ve all seen the numbers. Of ourse, the data varies based on whose report you read, but it is safe to say that the majority of reps don’t meet their sales quotas.

However, I would submit that it isn’t all the sales reps’ fault. Many aren’t coached well and don’t understand what is expected of them to produce satisfactory results. They simply aren’t adequately trained and developed in their craft.

Qualities of a Sales Leader

Sales leaders must take some of the blame. There are three main skill areas that indicate […]

Can One Size Fit All Sales?

Can One Size Fit All Sales?

When it comes to sales, should salespeople do it all, or should individual functions be divided among multiple people, each having specialized responsibilities? I’ve had several conversations lately about the virtues of each approach.

Do it All vs. Split it Up

Is the do-it-all method, where one salesperson hunts, closes and then manages the accounts after the sale better than, say, where an inside salesperson handles the inbound or outbound calls (or a sales development rep, as they are commonly called, gets appointments scheduled) and other salespeople conduct those meetings and close the sale? The truth is: each way may be right […]

What a Golfer’s Mind Can Teach Us About Sales

What a Golfer’s Mind Can Teach Us About Sales

There’s a great book by famed golf performance psychologist, Dr. Bob Rotella, called The Golfer’s Mind. I’ve been rereading it, as I do occasionally, and keep observing so many parallels to sales and the emotional discipline it takes to truly be the best one can be, that I feel the need to write about it.

The book is all about how to stay in the moment and focus on the target. In general, it is a handbook to enable golfers, both professional and amateur alike, to improve their mental game so that their mind doesn’t get in the way of their […]

The Lazy Leader Lull

The Lazy Leader Lull

I was reading Smart Business Columbus, a local publication, the other day. I came across an article written by Fred Koury, the President and CEO of the publisher, Smart Business Network. The topic struck a chord with me. It was about laziness and discipline in the magazine and it brought to mind a few leaders I have encountered recently who are frustrated by their sales teams’ performance.

Looking Inward

Even though they think their sales team is causing their frustration, I truly believe these leaders are likely simply frustrated with themselves. They have been lazy and lackluster in their focus to instill […]

Ineffective Sales Management: What to Do About It, Part One

At the risk of alienating some of my regular readers who are sales managers, we are going to talk about ineffective sales management today.

 

I recently heard another sales consultant speak and he made a great point about sales management.  He said,

“A sales manager’s job is not to grow sales.  A sales manager’s job is to grow salespeople in quality and quantity.”

I could not agree more.

 

Unfortunately, there are many CEO’s and business owners who ask the sales manager to both sell and manage.  It doesn’t work well.  You get a half-time presence in both roles.  And there are frankly additional reasons […]

Do Your Sales Managers Feel Like Babysitters? Part Two

Do Your Sales Managers Feel Like Babysitters? Part Two

Do Your Sales Managers Feel Like Babysitters?  Part Two

In Do Your Sales Managers Feel Like Babysitters? Part One, we talked about the situation where the sales manager or business leader becomes a babysitter because he or she would rather not have the conflict associated with holding the sales reps accountable to necessary activities regardless of their business performance.

In this article we will take a different approach regarding why you might be feeling like a babysitter.  Maybe you get frustrated because they don’t go do the necessary work, like you did when you were a sales rep.  After all, they are paid […]

Do Your Sales Managers Feel Like Babysitters? Part One

Do Your Sales Managers Feel Like Babysitters? Part One

One of the most consistent concerns I hear from CEO’s and sales managers is the stress associated with having to babysit their sales reps.  They feel like they constantly have to hound the reps to turn in their paperwork, update their pipeline, enter their call notes, and the list goes on and on.  If this sounds familiar then maybe you need to examine if it is something you are doing to cause this behavior.

One of the primary reasons that business leaders and sales managers fall into the trap of being the babysitter is typically because they really want their salespeople to […]