Are Your Salespeople Losing Emotional Control and Therefore Losing Sales?

Are Your Salespeople Losing Emotional Control and Therefore Losing Sales?

What can Jean Van de Velde teach salespeople about emotional discipline?

I had lunch the other day with the Regional President of a very successful company.  He has a long history of success as a salesperson, sales manager and business leader.  He is also a golfer.  In his words he is a “volatile” golfer.  He sometimes loses his temper on the golf course.  It got me thinking about the similarities between salespeople and golfers.  Those that execute emotional discipline in both categories tend to fare better.  For example:

Salespeople, who stay emotionally disciplined, generally focus on the information they need so outcomes […]

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Do Your Sales Managers Feel Like Babysitters? Part Two

Do Your Sales Managers Feel Like Babysitters? Part Two

Do Your Sales Managers Feel Like Babysitters?  Part Two

In Do Your Sales Managers Feel Like Babysitters? Part One, we talked about the situation where the sales manager or business leader becomes a babysitter because he or she would rather not have the conflict associated with holding the sales reps accountable to necessary activities regardless of their business performance.

In this article we will take a different approach regarding why you might be feeling like a babysitter.  Maybe you get frustrated because they don’t go do the necessary work, like you did when you were a sales rep.  After all, they are paid […]

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Do Your Sales Managers Feel Like Babysitters? Part One

Do Your Sales Managers Feel Like Babysitters? Part One

One of the most consistent concerns I hear from CEO’s and sales managers is the stress associated with having to babysit their sales reps.  They feel like they constantly have to hound the reps to turn in their paperwork, update their pipeline, enter their call notes, and the list goes on and on.  If this sounds familiar then maybe you need to examine if it is something you are doing to cause this behavior.

One of the primary reasons that business leaders and sales managers fall into the trap of being the babysitter is typically because they really want their salespeople to […]

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Holding Your Salespeople Accountable – Easier Said Than Done

If you have been a reader of my articles it will not be new to you that I believe the ability to hold your salespeople accountable is one of the most critical skills you must have if you want to succeed in sales management. Unfortunately, it does not necessarily come naturally to everyone. Is it energy draining to have to “babysit” your salespeople? Do you find yourself chasing them for necessary information and reports? You might suffer from an oversized need for approval. And this can get in your way in terms of successfully getting your salespeople to excel.

So here […]

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Get Your Salespeople to Shut Up and Listen

Okay everyone knows that to be an effective salesperson one needs to listen to the prospects and clients. So, we all know that, then why is it so difficult to get your salespeople to do it? I have recently noticed that many of the salespeople in my client companies are very seasoned and have been doing their job for many years. They are very experienced, and some are even considered experts in their field. I have discovered that there is frequently an inverse relationship between the experience level of the salesperson or new business developer and the listening they do […]

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Outcome Goals vs. Activity Goals

Sure we all know that the scorecard for sales reps is their closed business.  But, if we only focus on this “outcome” goal we may be putting too much pressure on the sales reps to perform and may actually reduce their likelihood of success.

 

Here’s what I mean.  We all know that our team and each individual needs to hit his or her sales goal.  However, they have absolutely no control over whether or not the prospect will actually buy anything, let alone anything from them.  When we, as managers, constantly harp on the end game, the closed business goal, without […]

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Do Your Salespeople Use Proposals to Avoid Negotiations?

In some of my recent articles I have discussed the merits surrounding getting salespeople to hold off on producing proposals until the prospect is fully qualified.  I have observed that many salespeople produce proposals because they are not skilled negotiators and they somehow think that if they put the information in writing the prospect will buy.  The truth is that the proposal should really be a confirmation of what has already been agreed to, or has been determined that the prospect wants, needs and is interested in buying.  Unfortunately, salespeople frequently rush in before these factors are understood.

 

The skilled negotiator […]

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Do Your Salespeople Rush to Provide Proposals?

Frequently salespeople are all too happy to produce proposals for anyone who is interested.  It is common that those same salespeople are avoiding truly qualifying prospects before producing the proposal.  It has become apparent to me through years of working with sales teams that much of this behavior is due to the belief that if they just put the information in writing they will avoid having to explain or address any concerns a prospect might have.  It is really a form of conflict avoidance.

Unfortunately, we allow salespeople to spend time producing pages and pages of proposals without truly understanding whether […]

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The Scary Math Associated with Producing Unqualified Proposals

In my last article, Reduce the Fluffy Pipeline Syndrome, I wrote about the time, effort and money associated with salespeople producing unqualified proposals.  If you are having difficulty breaking your salespeoples’ habit of producing unqualified proposals get them to do the math associated with their lost income as follows:

1. Calculate the per hour rate of pay (based on last year’s total compensation divided by 52, divided by 40).

2. Calculate how long it takes to produce one proposal on average (1 hour, 2 hours?).

3. Then add in the number of hours spent trying to chase the prospect down after sending the […]

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Reduce the Fluffy Pipeline Syndrome

 

Okay, so if you are monitoring your salespeople’s pipelines then that is a start.  Many managers focus on getting opportunities into the pipeline.  This is also a start.  If you want to be ultimately effective predicting closings and therefore revenue growth then you need to stop focusing on the pipeline value and focus on the pipeline velocity.  What I mean is that salespeople will typically behave in a manner that provides them reward and/or recognition.  Many salespeople seek the approval and recognition of their managers.  If you are focusing on patting people on the back for putting deals into the […]

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